Everything listed under: Tahoe Shrubs

  • Early Spring Mountain Gardening Classes 2017

    Every spring here is different. 
    We gradually open the nursery as it is appropriate to bring in hardy plants, to uncover and display the ones we have and to encourage planting as the snows melt and the snow storms abate.  We've been open 4 days a week since early April and go to 6 or 7 by early May if warming continues. We will have more snow, of course.  We are bringing a few loads of hardy perennials, color and vegetables each week. With some big loads of trees and shrubs arriving the week of 5/10. We usually offer classes in April and then begin again July through October. These are some early offerings.
    • April 24 - Garden Resurrection and Repair (Spring Cleaning) - 4:00PM @ Lake of the Sky Garden Club, Art Center in Tahoe City. Eric (a long-time certified arborist) was invited to speak after this particularly destructive winter. (visit our webpage). 
    • April 29 - Spring Gardening (w/ focus on basic pruning and damage repair) - 11AM-12PM @ Villager Nursery - Rob & Eric are offering this very basic class.
    • May 4 - Container Vegetables and Productive Tomatoes - 5:00-6:00PM @ Villager Nursery - Villager staff have been instructing mountain gardeners on successful varieties and techniques for over 40 years. (May the Forth be with You!). Hand-Out Here 
    • June 2-3 - Villager / Kellogg / G&B Free Planting Days - Friday & Saturday - You buy the plants and pots and We (Eileen, Gisele, Mike & Duncan) plant them for you using premium Master Nursery Gold Medal potting soil and authentic, organic G&B Fertilizers. Organic gardening specialist and educator with G&B Organics, Gisele Schoniger, will be here Friday and Saturday to answer ANY and ALL compost, mulch, organic landscaping or soil biology questions you can conceive of. 
    • NEWS - the late July 2017 Lake of the Sky Garden Tour has been cancelled "due to the unusually harsh winter". It would have been in Incline Village this summer. For information about joining this very active garden club check the website here.
    Visit & LIKE our Facebook page for random details, frost warnings, or specials on plants & fertilizers and check-out our website for good how-to resources.Ideas on pinterest. Photos on instagram. (check out Joey's @highsierrawildflowers on Instagram) 
  • February & March

    I was just looking back at the rains, snowfalls, low-temps, high-temps for the Feb & March. We didn't see much sun. I grew up in California and in the Sierras.  I'd been to Utah, Coloradoo, the midwest in winters and my memory was of extreme cold, squeaky snow, frozen fingers. I'd been plenty cold skiing and sledding as a kid in the Sierra, but out there, I didn't want to play outside.  Someone who'd moved to Truckee from the east to ski told me years ago that the Sierra winter is 2-3 days of snowfall followed by a week of sunshine, and throughout my life, that been largely true, I just didn't know that it was unique. This winter did not feel that way. I recall shoveling, a lot. The crawl-spaces flooded. Trees bent, broken or up-rooted. I hate to admit that I didn't feel much like getting out and enjoying that white sh*t.  

    We did have some beautiful spring-like days in March, which is normal, followed by more and more winter, which is also normal.  For folks that have moved here after spring 2011, this "spring" might seem unfair but I assure you it is by-far the norm. 

    From a gardening, landscaping and ecological perspective, the soils have been well insulated, are warm and many plants have been able to produce roots all winter long. Hardy seedlings are emerging beneath the melting snow and the ample soil moisture promises an amazing summer of wildflowers. I just walked along one well traveled road with five pounds of native wildflower seed mixed with Biosol.  Like those bulbs and sunflowers on Glenshire Dr. that Katrin and I planted, I hope to see these for years to come. 

    Voles, who do not hibernate, have been eating and breeding all winter, well hidden from their normal predators. We're just starting to see what havoc they have wreaked. 

    I'm enjoying raking my lawn in narrow paths AS the snow melts, just a little, every couple of days and it is a very manageable job.  We're expecting our first load of compost, including topper, in early April and I'll spread that around on the freshly raked turf.  I have SO much pruning and clean-up to do. I'm trying to follow the snow-melt to stay on top of it. If you lost plants, we are very sorry.  We did too and so did most folks. Snowshoing through the woods you can see that this was a harsh winter ALL around, MANY native trees and shrubs suffered damage as well.

    The snow-plow loaders pushed piles and ramps of snow thirty feet into my yard and I've yet to see the tops of many plants while the rotary plows that came through on some very cold nights literally shattered my blue spruce. I've seen the same on native fir. These plants all have root systems to support them, plenty of moisture in the soil and a determination to live and grow. Plants may develop a little "character" that stays with them forever and we'll be able to look at the dog-leg in a tree 20 years from now and say - "Ah! That's from the winter or '16-17".

  • 2014 Garden Tour Preview

    Pre Tour CollageRob, Druann and I were allowed to attend the docent / hosts preview tour of the gardens. Our thought being that we could offer insight, ID plants or answer questions the garden club members might have but this is a pretty savvy group and there was not too much we could offer.  There were several plant ID questions that will likely come-up during the tour so I jotted down a few comments here.  You can also visit our Facebook page where it is much easier to post photos and make comments than it is on our web-page.Eric @ Garden Pre Tour

  • Thank Heaven, a little more winter!

    I'm not going to lie, the nursery has better "numbers" in drought years. It's not just because we ardently promote drought tolerant landscaping nor the fact that we are avid native plant promoters; it's just that our season is longer, the snow melts sooner, and people have more time to spend in their gardens.  That said... NONE of us at Villager want dry winters.  We love wildflowers and lush meadows and obviously fear the threat of fire.  So... we are happy that winter snows have made a nice late showing.  Himmel sei Dank für Schnee!

    I often explain to clients that tossing wildflowers, like hydroseeding, is termed "Spray and Pray" because we spread the seed and pray that weather conditions will be favorable for both germination of the seed and for seedling survival.  Folks that planted seed this Feb and March (my favorite time for s&p), should be delighted come May as the warmed soil combined with all this moisture are making for excellent wildflower success.

    And for real success... We received 8000lbs of Biosol this week, at the request of dozens of clients (before winter returned).  We have about 7400lbs remaining in case your garden melts-out.  We started-off loving all-organic Biosol for its apparent vole-repelling properties but have continued to use it vigorously because it makes vegetable gardens, trees, shrubs, perennials, bubs and, of course, lawns, lush, healthy and strong throughout the growing season.

  • Fall is in the Air, Nursery-Wide Sale 9/13-9/22 2013 !

    Fall is in the Air

    Nursery-Wide Sale 

    9/13-9/22 2013 !

    DETAILS: sale flier here and newsletter here

    "Seconds" - We're bringing out healthy plants with a crook or a sealing scar or a broken top that are not quite retail salable but will grow with compost and fertilizer. These orphaned plants are CHEAP!

    50% Off Fruit Trees is a SMOKIN’ deal!  Apples, Pears, Cherries, and worthy of their blooms alone, Hardy Apricot and Peach.

    20% off (and no tax) on prolific Currants, Gooseberries, Hardy Grapes, Raspberries and Blueberries and will produce more fruit per square foot than any other plant.  The JostaBerry and TastiBerry (gooseberry x currant hybrids) are specialty plants we grew specifically for Truckee.

    20% OFF Tough-as-Nails Trees and Shrubs - The whole LOT!

    75% Off Annual Color: Stock, Geranium, Cali, Petunia, Nasturtium, Tender Grasses, etc...

    40% Off Perennial Herbs and Vegetables like Thyme, Asparagus, Sage, Mint, Lovage, etc...

    50% OFF Packaged (not Villager brand) Seeds:  Lake Valley, Renee, etc..

    30% Off Bulk Wildflower Seeds: (not packaged) >4 oz.

    30% Bulk Grass, Pasture, Clover Seeds: (not packaged) >5 lbs.

    Bearded Iris $2.99 (reg 4.99)

    Hyacinth Bulbs for indoor or outdoor 10 for 8.99 (reg. 1.29ea.)

    Early Indoor Only Paperwhite Narcissus 10 for 9.99 (reg. 1.39ea.)

    Inside the store: 10% off fertilizers, repellents, pesticides, herbicides.

    Inside the store: 50% off Hydroponic specific nutrients and Indoor Lighting and Growing Systems.

    The newsletter has a coupon for $$$ of of Biosol.  Sign-up to receive VERY infrequent news and notices. Sign-up if you want the newsletter coupons.

    40% OFF Beautiful Hardy Flowering Herbaceous Perennials like Coneflower, Daylily, Sedum, Lupine, Daisy, etc........

    Buy 4, get 1 FREE  on Potting Soils, Manures & Bark

    30% OFF Redwood Planters & Trellis’

    30% OFF LARGE  Pottery

    30% OFF Outdoor Art

    Parking Lot “Orphan Plants” Clearance

    All sales limited to stock on hand and no double discounts. Discounts off regular retail prices....


  • Happy Birthday Villager

    December 1, 1975 - December 1, 2013

    We have continued to grow and branch and flower and fruit and hedge and adapt in order to offer our clients an interesting, useful and beautiful selection of plant materials and products that insure your successes.  "We've killed thousands of plants, testing them in our own gardens, so our clients won't have to."

    Our Founder, Jeanette Harper and a partner finalized the purchase of the existing florist in the Gateway center 12/1/1975 and celebrated with Champagne in the office of the Gateway Motel with Roxie Arche and Azad McIver (Our current location is Azad's old home and dairy). 

    Eric showed-up in 1984 and Rob a couple of years after that.  Quite a few nurseries have come and gone in Truckee in 38 years. Some only lasted a season some for a decade or more.  We needed to move our nursery from Gateway to our current home in 1999. The reality is that Truckee is a ridiculous place to run a retail nursery. It seems that you have to be crazy. We also happen to be fanatical botanists and ecologists hell-bent on providing education and materials to local gardeners to show them that they CAN succeed in this harsh climate.

    We've thought that we could just offer the 20% of the plants that 80% of clients ask for and we'd be probably be profitable ... But what about the other 80% of really cool unique native and hardy plants that people SHOULD be using..? And what about that 20% of customers who LOVE natives or thrill at really cool, unique plants, bulbs and seeds from the far coldest corners and peaks around the globe?  It's more interesting the way we've been growing.  We are continually aware that we have YOU to thank for keeping us rooted in Truckee.  Thank You!

    Villager Nursery: helping mountain gardens thrive since 1975.  Experience you can trust / Information you can use.

  • "BIOSOL ! You can grow grass on a lift-tower with that stuff !"

    Biosol Forte Label.pdf

    Biosol MSDS.pdf

    Biosol Studies link

    BIOSOL

    Villager Nursery's FAVOITE fertilizer.  Biosol is our favorite winterizing fertilizer.  We use Biosol in the Villager Demonstration Gardens, and in all of our commercial and residential landscape projects.  Biosol helps Truckee Shrubs, Trees, Perennials and Bulbs thrive.  The Villager stocks Biosol year-round.  

    Biosol is an incredibly long-lasting fertilizer with amazing soil improving characteristics as well.  It is primarily cooked Penicillium that was cultured on and digested organic cottonseed and organic soybean meals.  It was essentially a waste product that was once used for aquaculture.  What it lacks in pleasant aroma (it lacks pleasant aroma) it more than makes up for in its amazing performance in ANY part of the garden.  

    Put Biosol on lawns in Fall.  Now.

    Biosol is an essential with any restoration, wildflower or lawn seeding.  Mix your grass and wildflower seeds with Biosol and Kellogg's Topper and broadcast just before we're expecting a huge snow.  So many folks over the years have said to us.."I know Biosol, we used to use it at (insert any ski area in the northern hemisphere here) and we swore you could grow grass on a lift tower with that stuff!"

  • 5 Paths to Abundance in your Mountain Garden next Spring and Summer


    1. Plant Trees and Shrubs Now. Deciduous trees and shrubs including apples and berries will produce as much as 80% of their annual root system expansion in fall, AFTER they lose their leaves. Don't miss this opportunity for amazing growth in your garden.(Trees and Shrubs 20% off and Buy-2-get-1-FREE fruit trees and berry bushes)
    2. Plant Perennials Now. Perennial flowers, herbs and vegetables will produce many more roots this fall. They'll rest in your soil over winter and rise with our natural spring schedule to produce far more bounty next summer. (Flowering perennials 30% off, perennial herbs and vegetables 50% off!)
    3. Apply Biosol in Fall. Biosol is a humus rich, natural and organic, slow-releasing fertilizer that improves soil while providing essential nutrients for plants and the billions of micro-allies that help plants thrive. For gardens, orchards, flowers, lawns, meadows and forests. (see coupon in newsletter...or sign-up for the next one)
    4. Topdress Your Gardens.  Applying Gromulch, Bumpercrop or Black Forest Mulch over the soil between plants protects shallow roots, introduces composting microorganisms, ads humus and provides a perfect transition layer under coarser wood or bark mulches. Gardens with more mulch suffered far less in last winter's drought. (ALL mulches, composts and potting soils are buy-4-get-1-FREE through 9/17)
    5. Go into winter with moist soil.  Make sure that after the plants have gone dormant, you continue to water occasionally to keep soil moisture plentiful.  Your plants' expanding root systems need the moisture to keep on going long after the tops appear to be asleep.  We often say water one-last-time around Thanksgiving but you may need to water after that.

Contact Villager

Villager Nursery, Inc
10678 Donner Pass Road, Truckee, CA 96161-4834
Central Truckee, exit 186 off I-80
(530) 587-0771
www.villagernursery.com
info@villagernursery

Founded 1975, Incorporated 1990

California Nursery License 1975
No. C 3976.001, Co.29CA
Contractors License 1977
No. 413907-C27 LS
ISA Certified Arborist: Eric Larusson
No. WE-7983A

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