Everything listed under: gardening classes

  • Early Spring Mountain Gardening Classes 2017

    Every spring here is different. 
    We gradually open the nursery as it is appropriate to bring in hardy plants, to uncover and display the ones we have and to encourage planting as the snows melt and the snow storms abate.  We've been open 4 days a week since early April and go to 6 or 7 by early May if warming continues. We will have more snow, of course.  We are bringing a few loads of hardy perennials, color and vegetables each week. With some big loads of trees and shrubs arriving the week of 5/10. We usually offer classes in April and then begin again July through October. These are some early offerings.
    • April 24 - Garden Resurrection and Repair (Spring Cleaning) - 4:00PM @ Lake of the Sky Garden Club, Art Center in Tahoe City. Eric (a long-time certified arborist) was invited to speak after this particularly destructive winter. (visit our webpage). 
    • April 29 - Spring Gardening (w/ focus on basic pruning and damage repair) - 11AM-12PM @ Villager Nursery - Rob & Eric are offering this very basic class.
    • May 4 - Container Vegetables and Productive Tomatoes - 5:00-6:00PM @ Villager Nursery - Villager staff have been instructing mountain gardeners on successful varieties and techniques for over 40 years. (May the Forth be with You!). Hand-Out Here 
    • June 2-3 - Villager / Kellogg / G&B Free Planting Days - Friday & Saturday - You buy the plants and pots and We (Eileen, Gisele, Mike & Duncan) plant them for you using premium Master Nursery Gold Medal potting soil and authentic, organic G&B Fertilizers. Organic gardening specialist and educator with G&B Organics, Gisele Schoniger, will be here Friday and Saturday to answer ANY and ALL compost, mulch, organic landscaping or soil biology questions you can conceive of. 
    • NEWS - the late July 2017 Lake of the Sky Garden Tour has been cancelled "due to the unusually harsh winter". It would have been in Incline Village this summer. For information about joining this very active garden club check the website here.
    Visit & LIKE our Facebook page for random details, frost warnings, or specials on plants & fertilizers and check-out our website for good how-to resources.Ideas on pinterest. Photos on instagram. (check out Joey's @highsierrawildflowers on Instagram) 
  • Education & Villager 2015 SPRING Classes

    Villager 2015 Spring Classes - When I first worked with Villager Nursery in 1984 (~8 years after the existing florist was purchased) we began giving classes & sending out informational newsletters. Education in natural sciences gave me a strong bent toward environmentally conscious organic landscaping including natural pest controls and using as many drought tolerant and mountain-native plants as possible. Rob joined us just 2 years later and taught us the wonders of bat guano, worm castings and many organic fertilizers.  The tradition of education and working WITH our ecosystem, continues to this day. We are very disappointed and concerned about the drought AND we have been promoting drought tolerant landscaping and native plants since 1984. Most folks water far more than they need to. Back to the reason for this post, our SPRING class schedule is here if you'd like to see it. For MORE info sign-up for our VERY occasional e-mail newsletters and visit us (better yet, do LIKE us) on Facebook.


  • Seedlings are up

    On Tuesday 3/4, Jose and I planted several non-GMO and USDA certified Organic seeds into a variety of mediums in several window-sill starter-kits just to see if there is much difference side-by-side.  We used BlackGold seedling mix, coir expanding pellets (similar to peat-pellets), and rock-wool.  We, of course, watered them in with seaweed. Put them on heat-mats and under T5 fluorescent lights.  Maxicrop or Dr.Earth - no difference  I Just came back to town from a few days away and the seeds are sprouted and well-up (3/10).  Tomato, Pepper, Cilantro, Basil (like CRAZY), as well as native Birch. Check-out the BRIEF veggie planting overview.


  • Unusual Aspen Breakage in Mountain Gardens

    Comments on the storm of 28-29 December 2010

    This storm came into Truckee and Tahoe with a cold front.  It then turned very wet and gradually piled up as the temperatures dropped.  I have seen more broken tops in quaking aspen (Populis tremuloides) than ever before (several dozen while driving in town).  There seems to be more damage at lower elevations, probably because it did not rain at the higher elevations so the snow was not as sticky.  Aspen has a tendency to grow rather quickly when we water and feed it but it is usually fairly flexible.  The trees that broke did not have unusually rapid growth, they were average, healthy trees.  I am guessing that we will see lots of evidence of breakage in wild local aspen as well.  We regularly see very disfigured and broken aspen in the canyons of the southern Sierra where we collect seeds of Villager Nursery's favorite, and indestructible, western river birch (Betula occidentalis var fontinalis). 

    I had been waiting to prune my broken Aspen until a little later.  Any time after mid March should be fine (earlier and there will likely be drying and die-back from the cut). Cut just above, and sloping away from, the next substantial lateral branch, below the break,  that can assume the role of leader.  Do not cut to a small branch if there is any choice.  By large I mean 1/2 - 2/3+ the diameter of the main trunk.  As long as you are at it, go ahead and prune any competing leaders back to large laterals as well, it's called "subordination"of potential competitors. If pruned properly, the tree should "recapitulate" a new leader.  

    Aspen do best with one strong trunk and one stout and dominant leader.  The narrow, pyramidal form that young deciduous trees and most coniferous evergreens exhibit is called "excurrent growth". I find pruning for excurrent growth is relatively simple to visualize and practice.   Our first class of spring is usually, "Resurrection" after the ravages of winter.

    html: http://bit.ly/idtSMr

    iCal: http://bit.ly/hjGBTc

    xml: http://bit.ly/hiE7U5


  • Start Tomato Seeds Indoor in March

    (03/2010) March is counted as one of our winter months. March also happens to have the most beautiful sunny spring-like days. Rob likes to quote a famous VanDyke who said that "The first spring day and the first day of spring are often months apart".  We may have beautiful spring days for the equinox but frost-free days are a long-way-off.

    For years, just before Valentines day, I planted violas, dianthus, calendula, pansys, vinca, primrose and stock in a flower box outside the nursery.  Those plants always thrive, no matter how cold it gets.

    The first Tuesday in March is Vermont's Town Meeting Day. According to Lewis Hill (Cold Climate Gardening), it is also the traditional day to start Tomato and Pepper seeds inside in northernVermont (their climate is similar to ours in many ways).  We have used mid-March as our seeding time for decades with great success.   I heard recently that said Tomatoes are the "gateway drug" to vegetable gardening.  We all grow tomatoes here (in containers) with great success (and frost protecting cloth).  It's not THAT hard.  Our goal at the Villager is, and has always been, to share our passion for gardening and to see our clients and friends SUCCEED in this avocation we love so much.  

    We offer several vegetable gardening classes at the Nursery each spring; check the calendar page. It should be updated by mid March with this year's schedule.  

Contact Villager

Villager Nursery, Inc
10678 Donner Pass Road, Truckee, CA 96161-4834
Central Truckee, exit 186 off I-80
(530) 587-0771
www.villagernursery.com
info@villagernursery

Founded 1975, Incorporated 1990

California Nursery License 1975
No. C 3976.001, Co.29CA
Contractors License 1977
No. 413907-C27 LS
ISA Certified Arborist: Eric Larusson
No. WE-7983A

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