Everything listed under: High Sierra Gardens

  • October 2018

    So, our "Fall Sale" ended on the 14th.

    We have brought in so many trucks of fresh material throughout this year's fall planting season.  We have ANOTHER truckload of aspen arriving Wed / Thurs 10/17-18 and then another truck full of conifers, maples and native plants arriving on the 22nd.  It continues.

    Along with the aspen on this week's truck, we have more of the amazing, hardy, fast-growing, fall-coloring, and extremely large Acer ginnala (Flame and Tartarian Maples - Acer ginnala var ginnala = Amur Maple / Flame Maple; A. ginnala var. tartaricum = Tartarian / Hot Wings Maple).  We have dozens of these in a variety of sizes and we'll be offering them at 20% off through the month.  

    Eric cannot resist interesting hardy perennials and native wildflowers, thus, we have an abundance, possibly an over-abundance, and so, we will continue to have the 4", 6-pack and mud-flats of hardy perennials at 30% off (in order to reduce the winterizing work we have to do). Also, we'll offer 20% off all the #1g and up herbaceous perennials.  We reserve the right to give random deeper discounts for large purchases.

    AND, walking around the nursery, looking at all the amazing plants we have, I noticed a couple more we have an over-abundance of:  Physocarpus (nine bark), Syringa (Lilac - we brought in 100's for spring blooming), Spring Snow crabapples (an absolute cloud or solid blooms EVERY spring), and, still, for Glenshire folk, Pinus monophyla (Piñon Pine).  ALL these will be 30% off through the end of the month....

    One, more thing.... In our "challenging" soils, when you go to the trouble to dig a hole for a tree, shrub or perennial, add compost and organic fertilizer... DON'T waste the hole by filling it in without at least tossing in a few bulbs.  This time of year, we say, NEVER waste a planting hole!

    Winterizing Class with Rob VanDyke 10/20

  • A Very Brief Overview of Mountain Vegetable Gardening

    In Truckee, our "average last date of frost", the day when the chance of frost drops below 15%, is July 15 and our "average date of first frost" is August 15. It is important to aways have floating row-cover "frost cloth" on hand. It is a spun-bonded polyester fabric developed for frost protection in the late 70's and it is much better for plants than sheets or plastic sheeting. It allows air, water and light through it while trapping warmth. 

    Our brief gardening class handout explains a little more:  High Sierra Organic Gardening

  • October Winterizing and Fall Planting Blow-Out Specials

    Late October Nursery Sale thru 10/31

    Check-out the latest newsletter, for those on the e-mail list. http://campaign.r20.constantcontact.com/render?m=1102261798136&ca=c5638956-cc07-477b-a090-e8ee25d95775

    Details enclosed.  There are some really great deals. Really.  Check it out for coupons but some of the specials are here:

    October Sale Details   (all discounts are off regular individual prices)
    50% Off: Honeyberry, Twinberry, Mock Orange, Sumac and Oaks
    50% Off: Botanical Interests packets of vegetable and flower seeds
    40% Off: 4" and quart wildflowers & perennials.  Hardy vines including hop & clematis.
    30% Off: Woody trees* and shrubs including many spring flowering and fall coloring plants plus all sizes of perennials and groundcovers larger than quart pots. 
    30% Off: Outdoor pottery, birdbaths and redwood planters
    20% Off: *Quaking Aspen (full truck-load arriving this week).
    20% Off: All G&B Lawn (and others) and Dr.Earth fertilizers (apply with BIOSOL).
    10% Off: Hardy bulbs (excludes bulk bags and crates always @ 20% off)
    10% Off: Winterizing Tree Tape (Villager-Brown 1"x150'x8mil. plus others up to 20mil)

    Visit our Facebook page, our website References page and come by the nursery soon to shop the sale for the best choices.  If you found this newsletter on-line or via Facebook, sign-up to receive your very own.
  • NEWS: Lake of the Sky Garden Club 2017

    A message from the Garden Club: The 2017 Lake of the Sky Garden Tour (Incline Village) has been cancelled "due to the unusually harsh winter".  We hope to reschedule it for next year.

    If you or anyone you know is interested in this very active and fun-loving group, Pat Dolle is our Vice President for Membership: padndad@hotmail.com.  We meet the last Monday of the month (except May when we meet the third Monday).  We usually meet at the Corrison Loft, North Lake Tahoe Art Center (upstairs), 380 North Lake Tahoe Boulevard, Tahoe City. Social time is 3:30PM with the meeting from 4-5PM.  The meetings are informative mixtures of lectures, demonstrations, and workshops conducted by members or guest speakers.  In summer some meetings are held at outdoor locations.

    There appears to be no active webpage or simple Facebook page... for a garden club with SO many great pictures to share, that seems a shame.  Want to help?


  • February & March

    I was just looking back at the rains, snowfalls, low-temps, high-temps for the Feb & March. We didn't see much sun. I grew up in California and in the Sierras.  I'd been to Utah, Coloradoo, the midwest in winters and my memory was of extreme cold, squeaky snow, frozen fingers. I'd been plenty cold skiing and sledding as a kid in the Sierra, but out there, I didn't want to play outside.  Someone who'd moved to Truckee from the east to ski told me years ago that the Sierra winter is 2-3 days of snowfall followed by a week of sunshine, and throughout my life, that been largely true, I just didn't know that it was unique. This winter did not feel that way. I recall shoveling, a lot. The crawl-spaces flooded. Trees bent, broken or up-rooted. I hate to admit that I didn't feel much like getting out and enjoying that white sh*t.  

    We did have some beautiful spring-like days in March, which is normal, followed by more and more winter, which is also normal.  For folks that have moved here after spring 2011, this "spring" might seem unfair but I assure you it is by-far the norm. 

    From a gardening, landscaping and ecological perspective, the soils have been well insulated, are warm and many plants have been able to produce roots all winter long. Hardy seedlings are emerging beneath the melting snow and the ample soil moisture promises an amazing summer of wildflowers. I just walked along one well traveled road with five pounds of native wildflower seed mixed with Biosol.  Like those bulbs and sunflowers on Glenshire Dr. that Katrin and I planted, I hope to see these for years to come. 

    Voles, who do not hibernate, have been eating and breeding all winter, well hidden from their normal predators. We're just starting to see what havoc they have wreaked. 

    I'm enjoying raking my lawn in narrow paths AS the snow melts, just a little, every couple of days and it is a very manageable job.  We're expecting our first load of compost, including topper, in early April and I'll spread that around on the freshly raked turf.  I have SO much pruning and clean-up to do. I'm trying to follow the snow-melt to stay on top of it. If you lost plants, we are very sorry.  We did too and so did most folks. Snowshoing through the woods you can see that this was a harsh winter ALL around, MANY native trees and shrubs suffered damage as well.

    The snow-plow loaders pushed piles and ramps of snow thirty feet into my yard and I've yet to see the tops of many plants while the rotary plows that came through on some very cold nights literally shattered my blue spruce. I've seen the same on native fir. These plants all have root systems to support them, plenty of moisture in the soil and a determination to live and grow. Plants may develop a little "character" that stays with them forever and we'll be able to look at the dog-leg in a tree 20 years from now and say - "Ah! That's from the winter or '16-17".

Contact Villager

Villager Nursery, Inc
10678 Donner Pass Road, Truckee, CA 96161-4834
Central Truckee, exit 186 off I-80
(530) 587-0771
www.villagernursery.com
info@villagernursery

Founded 1975, Incorporated 1990

California Nursery License 1975
No. C 3976.001, Co.29CA
Contractors License 1977
No. 413907-C27 LS
ISA Certified Arborist: Eric Larusson
No. WE-7983A

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