Everything listed under: tahoe wildflowers

  • "Shoulder Season"

    "Shoulder Season" in the travel industry came to mean the periods between high season and low season. In Truckee, since we have high season and high season, it should maybe be called "waist" season. The lake seems to experience this between seasons lul more than Truckee does these days. In the nursery, our busiest season is spring. We rapidly ramp-up from late April until early July when our business slowly tapers off into fall when, because FALL IS FOR PLANTING, we have a little bump in activity that quickly fades into the shoulder season: October and November when folks are otherwise occupied (gathering acorns or maybe wood). We reduce our hours and close on Sundays (we have to gather acorns too).  We still have planting projects and many landscapers are still active until the soils freeze or deep snow makes it impractical to dig. We plant a lot of bulbs and wildflower seed and the shoulder season is the best time for non-irrigated restoration / revegetation work.  The autumnal thermal overturn is just around the corner when soils begin to freeze and stay frozen (the perfect time to spread Biosol...everywhere). 

    "Ecology books speak of the "autumnal thermal overturn" when the average air temperature stays colder than the average soil temperature.  We hope for a good deep frost before the snows come because it is makes digging harder for voles.  'If ice skating is good the voles won't be as bad next spring'.  Deep in the soil the earth is consistently warm and once the blanket of insulating snow covers it, the soil begins to thaw allowing roots to continue expanding".  Wildflower seeding on top of the first 3" of snow is a technique that has worked very well for many."

    Winterizing the gardens and tying-up young plantings also occupies a bit of time in the shoulder season. Fall lawn care is essential. We stake and wrap the lower branches of trees and shrubs for the first 2-3 winters to protect their important "photosynthetic potential" (energy producing leaf surfaces) that feed the trunk to improve caliper and help develop good taper.

    Now is still a great time for planting all sorts of plants, we usually have some daily or weekly specials we post to FB or the chalkboard based on something we notice that we have a LOT of or that's just cool or interesting.  We ave begun to put the nursery away for the winter, tucking the pots into shade, giving them an anti-transpirant and tossing around plant-skydd animal repellent. Rob and crew will be out wrapping trees and shrubs once leaves fall and after that, we'll go cut a few Christmas trees.

  • Hailstorm & Crazy

     

    12:50PM 9 July 2015, I was leaving town to go for an afternoon hike on the west side, taking Old 40 for beauty-sake and I stopped to take a picture of town getting (what I THOUGHT was) rain. I posted to Villager Nursery Facebook how using row-cover can save your garden from hail damage.  Minutes later driving over the summit, Rob sent me this picture.

      

    We were not hit as hard as part of Glenshire / Cambridge was hit in 2013 (TOTAL defoliation) but we suffered 20-30% foliage loss. Pretty rough. The perennials, trees and shrubs will be fine with some torn leaves. Everyone here covered (with row-cover) what they could of the annual color, on VERY short notice and they're perfect.  We've already been giving them seaweed for cell strength and protection as well as organic fertilizers to help them flush-out again this summer. We are working on a Hailstorm Sale Newsletter  this weekend for plants that just won't look as fantastic as they did (this summer) before the 9th.

     

    Marbles falling from ±35,000 ft. Ouch.

     

     

  • Education & Villager 2015 SPRING Classes

    Villager 2015 Spring Classes - When I first worked with Villager Nursery in 1984 (~8 years after the existing florist was purchased) we began giving classes & sending out informational newsletters. Education in natural sciences gave me a strong bent toward environmentally conscious organic landscaping including natural pest controls and using as many drought tolerant and mountain-native plants as possible. Rob joined us just 2 years later and taught us the wonders of bat guano, worm castings and many organic fertilizers.  The tradition of education and working WITH our ecosystem, continues to this day. We are very disappointed and concerned about the drought AND we have been promoting drought tolerant landscaping and native plants since 1984. Most folks water far more than they need to. Back to the reason for this post, our SPRING class schedule is here if you'd like to see it. For MORE info sign-up for our VERY occasional e-mail newsletters and visit us (better yet, do LIKE us) on Facebook.


  • 2014 Garden Tour Preview

    Pre Tour CollageRob, Druann and I were allowed to attend the docent / hosts preview tour of the gardens. Our thought being that we could offer insight, ID plants or answer questions the garden club members might have but this is a pretty savvy group and there was not too much we could offer.  There were several plant ID questions that will likely come-up during the tour so I jotted down a few comments here.  You can also visit our Facebook page where it is much easier to post photos and make comments than it is on our web-page.Eric @ Garden Pre Tour

  • Truckee Gardening Season

    Our gardening season and our "growing season" are not the same. We were gardening in February this year, planting shrubs we didn't get to in the fall as well as seeds and bulbs we forgot we had.  MANY clients were preparing their raised-beds and planting beet and radish seeds. The could have been plating seedlings of chard and kale as well. The best spinach I've ever had was grown from seedlings I planted in early April that then laid covered with snow for 2+ weeks. Our growing season, according to NOAA, is our "frost-free period", when we have less than a 10% chance of ≤ 32°F on any given night, is July 15-August 15.  July 31 is the middle of our growing season.

    Our "average" temperatures are derived from wildly fluctuating daily temperatures at all times of the year. The average gives us a rough guide with which we make wildly fluctuating guesses at how cold it might get on any given day.  That said, it is a tool, much like the USDA zones or the useless-to-mountain-folk Sunset western zones (see Northeastern for a more useful tool).  I've posted this pic of our chalkboard before but it "bears repeating".

    Here is a graph of an "average" winter (temperature-wise). Jan15, 2013-Jan 14, 2014. For interest, note where the "average" nighttime low is ≥32° and where the average daytime temps average ≥70°F.

    I think that, without a greenhouse, our "average" mountain gardening season in Truckee is about March 15 - November 1 (or 15).  It is a matter of taking advantage of clear and warm conditions, choosing the right plants and crops and being able to protect the harvests of others (see RowCover). If you have an unheated greenhouse you can add 3-6 weeks on either end of that gardening season for some veggies. 

    I have planted hardy annuals in February MANY times with great success (pansy, viola, dianthus, calendula, stock, primrose) and I have also planted dormant trees and shrubs in December, January, February and March with excellent success.

  • Happy Halloween and Biosol is Back in Stock!

    We bring in tons of material late to encourage fall planting because it is GOOD FOR YOUand then we put much of it on sale to reduce our overwintering efforts.  Also, plants are always happier in the ground than in pots and WE LIKE HAPPY PLANTS.
    SO - until we finish putting plants away... in the next couple of weeks... the Final Sales are:
    ALL Outdoor Bulbs: 20% off* (*of ¢ or $/ea price),
    Hardy Trees* and Shrubs are 20% (*except spruce we JUST brought in for Living Christmas Trees).
    4' & Qt. Hardy Perennials are 50% off,
    ≥ #1g Hardy Perennials are 40% off,
    All the bagged composts, manures and potting soils are "buy 4-get 1 free",
    We have a pallet and a rack full of "orphan" plants of all sizes for cheap,
    Pottery over 14" dia. and all redwood planters: 30% off,
    Outside Garden Art: 30% off (gift ideas?)
    & Pumpkins are $3.99 (1 free to anyone under 6  from 10/28-10/31 while they last).  Happy Halloween.


  • Fall is in the Air, Nursery-Wide Sale 9/13-9/22 2013 !

    Fall is in the Air

    Nursery-Wide Sale 

    9/13-9/22 2013 !

    DETAILS: sale flier here and newsletter here

    "Seconds" - We're bringing out healthy plants with a crook or a sealing scar or a broken top that are not quite retail salable but will grow with compost and fertilizer. These orphaned plants are CHEAP!

    50% Off Fruit Trees is a SMOKIN’ deal!  Apples, Pears, Cherries, and worthy of their blooms alone, Hardy Apricot and Peach.

    20% off (and no tax) on prolific Currants, Gooseberries, Hardy Grapes, Raspberries and Blueberries and will produce more fruit per square foot than any other plant.  The JostaBerry and TastiBerry (gooseberry x currant hybrids) are specialty plants we grew specifically for Truckee.

    20% OFF Tough-as-Nails Trees and Shrubs - The whole LOT!

    75% Off Annual Color: Stock, Geranium, Cali, Petunia, Nasturtium, Tender Grasses, etc...

    40% Off Perennial Herbs and Vegetables like Thyme, Asparagus, Sage, Mint, Lovage, etc...

    50% OFF Packaged (not Villager brand) Seeds:  Lake Valley, Renee, etc..

    30% Off Bulk Wildflower Seeds: (not packaged) >4 oz.

    30% Bulk Grass, Pasture, Clover Seeds: (not packaged) >5 lbs.

    Bearded Iris $2.99 (reg 4.99)

    Hyacinth Bulbs for indoor or outdoor 10 for 8.99 (reg. 1.29ea.)

    Early Indoor Only Paperwhite Narcissus 10 for 9.99 (reg. 1.39ea.)

    Inside the store: 10% off fertilizers, repellents, pesticides, herbicides.

    Inside the store: 50% off Hydroponic specific nutrients and Indoor Lighting and Growing Systems.

    The newsletter has a coupon for $$$ of of Biosol.  Sign-up to receive VERY infrequent news and notices. Sign-up if you want the newsletter coupons.

    40% OFF Beautiful Hardy Flowering Herbaceous Perennials like Coneflower, Daylily, Sedum, Lupine, Daisy, etc........

    Buy 4, get 1 FREE  on Potting Soils, Manures & Bark

    30% OFF Redwood Planters & Trellis’

    30% OFF LARGE  Pottery

    30% OFF Outdoor Art

    Parking Lot “Orphan Plants” Clearance

    All sales limited to stock on hand and no double discounts. Discounts off regular retail prices....


Contact Villager

Villager Nursery, Inc
10678 Donner Pass Road, Truckee, CA 96161-4834
Central Truckee, exit 186 off I-80
(530) 587-0771
www.villagernursery.com
info@villagernursery

Founded 1975, Incorporated 1990

California Nursery License 1975
No. C 3976.001, Co.29CA
Contractors License 1977
No. 413907-C27 LS
ISA Certified Arborist: Eric Larusson
No. WE-7983A

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