Everything listed under: truckee trees

  • FALL PLANT SALE

    FALL PLANT SALE 9/15 - 10/15/2017
    Right NOW is the sweet-spot for mountain gardeners: Villager Nursery has a huge, fresh selection, the plants are on sale AND it's the best time for planting everything AND its the most comfortable time for planting.  Visit our Facebook page, our website Referencespage and come by the nursery soon to shop the sale for the best choices.  If you found this newsletter on-line or via Facebook, sign-up to receive your very own.


  • February & March

    I was just looking back at the rains, snowfalls, low-temps, high-temps for the Feb & March. We didn't see much sun. I grew up in California and in the Sierras.  I'd been to Utah, Coloradoo, the midwest in winters and my memory was of extreme cold, squeaky snow, frozen fingers. I'd been plenty cold skiing and sledding as a kid in the Sierra, but out there, I didn't want to play outside.  Someone who'd moved to Truckee from the east to ski told me years ago that the Sierra winter is 2-3 days of snowfall followed by a week of sunshine, and throughout my life, that been largely true, I just didn't know that it was unique. This winter did not feel that way. I recall shoveling, a lot. The crawl-spaces flooded. Trees bent, broken or up-rooted. I hate to admit that I didn't feel much like getting out and enjoying that white sh*t.  

    We did have some beautiful spring-like days in March, which is normal, followed by more and more winter, which is also normal.  For folks that have moved here after spring 2011, this "spring" might seem unfair but I assure you it is by-far the norm. 

    From a gardening, landscaping and ecological perspective, the soils have been well insulated, are warm and many plants have been able to produce roots all winter long. Hardy seedlings are emerging beneath the melting snow and the ample soil moisture promises an amazing summer of wildflowers. I just walked along one well traveled road with five pounds of native wildflower seed mixed with Biosol.  Like those bulbs and sunflowers on Glenshire Dr. that Katrin and I planted, I hope to see these for years to come. 

    Voles, who do not hibernate, have been eating and breeding all winter, well hidden from their normal predators. We're just starting to see what havoc they have wreaked. 

    I'm enjoying raking my lawn in narrow paths AS the snow melts, just a little, every couple of days and it is a very manageable job.  We're expecting our first load of compost, including topper, in early April and I'll spread that around on the freshly raked turf.  I have SO much pruning and clean-up to do. I'm trying to follow the snow-melt to stay on top of it. If you lost plants, we are very sorry.  We did too and so did most folks. Snowshoing through the woods you can see that this was a harsh winter ALL around, MANY native trees and shrubs suffered damage as well.

    The snow-plow loaders pushed piles and ramps of snow thirty feet into my yard and I've yet to see the tops of many plants while the rotary plows that came through on some very cold nights literally shattered my blue spruce. I've seen the same on native fir. These plants all have root systems to support them, plenty of moisture in the soil and a determination to live and grow. Plants may develop a little "character" that stays with them forever and we'll be able to look at the dog-leg in a tree 20 years from now and say - "Ah! That's from the winter or '16-17".

  • 4th of July

    Happy Independence Day!  Villager will be hanging-out, watering plants, watching the parade and we'll stick-around until 2:00 pm or so the close and head for cool water.  We're open regular hours Tuesday, 9-5:30p.

  • Willow & Aspen Fungal Foliage Funks

    Aspen Fungal Foliage Diseases - "Many fungi are capable of attacking aspen leaves, from juvenile growth to senescence. However, only a few may be of local significance; and even then, their damage is of consequence only when they cause moderate to severe defoliation. Small trees suffer the most damage, and may be killed by repeated infections. Clonal susceptibility to individual foliage diseases is common, but under certain conditions, whole stands can become infected. Because these fungi kill areas of leaves and often cause premature defoliation, their damage is usually confined to reduced tree growth of severely infected trees. Therefore, in most areas, these diseases are not important in aspen management" (Christensen et al. 1951).

    "Black leaf spot - caused by Marssonina populi (Lib.)Magn., is the most common leaf disease of quaking aspen in the West. Small brownish spots appear on the infected leaves in late July and early August. The spots later enlarge and turn blackish, and are of various sizes and irregular in outline, with a yellowish to golden border. Infection is usually more severe on smaller trees and in the lower crowns of larger trees. Light infection is common in many western stands, and clonal susceptibility is noticeable. Epidemic conditions are intensified by abundant rainfall in the spring and summer (Harniss and Nelson 1984, Mielke 1957). Twig and branch mortality after two severe infection years has been reported (Harniss and Nelson 1984, Mielke 1957). These epidemic situations may kill trees. However, the effect of leaf spot on overall aspen mortality is assumed to be of little consequence, because successive epidemic years are unusual, and even then mortality appears to be light. In most years, the annual infection repeats only in the lower crown, and usually late in the growing season." - Thomas E. Hinds 

    As Rob says of aspen and lawns, “The best defense is a good offense”. Shallow rooted aspen grow far from creeks and moist meadows in the continental climate of Colorado. In our far west, they are a riparian species. Aspen love deep soils, rich in organic matter & nitrogen, ample moisture and plentiful vegetation or mulch covering the ground far wider than the trees are tall.  Because they frequently have insect pests and foliage diseases (and because they want to spread across the globe), they are best used in the farthest corner of a landscape, along the sunny back property line for their excellent fast growth and dense screening.

    The golden fungal rusts (Melampsora spp.?) that usually affect the Lemmon’s willow in late August nearly every year, began in ernest in late June this year and have also been unusually rampant on Scouler’s willow. Stressed plants from dry winters (very low soil moisture) combined with the “abundant rainfall” is ideal for fungal foliage infections. It is unlikely the plants will suffer. Like their close relative aspen, willows thrive on water, food & mulch.

     

    The golden spores of Melampsora willow rusts. Unusually rampant this summer of "abundant rainfall". Lemmon's willows almost always have this fungus in late August but it started in June this year and it is on most of our native species. it is NOT a worry. FB


  • Water Restrictions and Exemptions in the TDPUD sphere...

     

    Because our irrigation restrictions WERE greater than those in Placerville, Auburn, the Tahoe Basin and MANY other districts...  AND because (as we are frequently told by TDPUD) we have recharging water tables and adequate (if not ample) water supply, WE requested (and were granted: 6/3/15) a hardship exemption, on behalf of the community. SO...  IN-SPITE of our PUD's best efforts to tell you through various media that you can ONLY irrigate on Tuesday and Friday, you can in-fact irrigate as needed when watering responsibly with drip (incl. micro-spray, soakers & drip emitters), syringing (a light spray to cool-off stressed plants), and selectively hand-watering specific plants, planters, and spots in need. "*Plant containers, trees, shrubs, ground covers and vegetable gardens may be watered as needed when using automatic drip irrigation or hand-watering".  The Truckee Demonstration Garden's efforts very early-on gave us the exemption to irrigate all edibles as needed (taken as annual & perennial vegetables, herbs, berry bushes and fruit trees).

    PLEASE.... NO BARE SOIL in your garden. MULCH everywhere. Mulch on bare soil 10 feet from your plants is keeping that fine-silty soil from drying-out and from wicking water away from your plants. DO NOT mulch over tree or shrub trunks or over herbaceous plants (unless with a fine compost like Topper).

    AND..  WATER YOUR SURROUNDING FOREST.  2-4 times this summer, on your watering day, put an oscillating sprinkler out among the big pines and fir surrounding your home, near and as far as you can go.  Water enough to soak the soil 2-3 feet.  We may have "adequate" supply in our wells but we are definitely in a drought and our soils are DRY!. Trees are dying all around us from the past 3 dry winters (desiccation & beetle attack) and you can prevent yours from dying by giving them a couple of deep waterings.

     

  • Education & Villager 2015 SPRING Classes

    Villager 2015 Spring Classes - When I first worked with Villager Nursery in 1984 (~8 years after the existing florist was purchased) we began giving classes & sending out informational newsletters. Education in natural sciences gave me a strong bent toward environmentally conscious organic landscaping including natural pest controls and using as many drought tolerant and mountain-native plants as possible. Rob joined us just 2 years later and taught us the wonders of bat guano, worm castings and many organic fertilizers.  The tradition of education and working WITH our ecosystem, continues to this day. We are very disappointed and concerned about the drought AND we have been promoting drought tolerant landscaping and native plants since 1984. Most folks water far more than they need to. Back to the reason for this post, our SPRING class schedule is here if you'd like to see it. For MORE info sign-up for our VERY occasional e-mail newsletters and visit us (better yet, do LIKE us) on Facebook.


  • Plant ID and Problem Diagnosis

    Our Odds Game - We know our plants and what grows here and we have keen eyes for interesting irregularities in native AND planted landscapes.  We are also noted for our ability to diagnose plant and general garden issues. Some of us have degrees in Horticulture, Botany and Ecology and we have many decades each, experimenting (succeeding and failing) in our own gardens. And additionally we have YOU and thousands of other clients who over the years have shared their many and varied experiences with us (our vicarious experience) which hugely increases our knowledge of scenarios, causes and effects which we then use to help more clients with questions and issues.  

    It is the nature of diagnosis, relying on past experiences, that we see certain plants or animals displaying common patterns of growth or behavior.  Our opinions are often very much based on odds as in "odds are that the reason your lilacs don't bloom is because they are in too much shade, or they've been pruned after mid-July" or that "your peony is buried too deep" or "those spots on your aspen in August are because the leaves have been on the plants a little too long" or "the brown areas in the lawn are from poor sprayer coverage" or "late spring frost killed the spruce buds in many locations"... etc.  Sometimes there are other "rare" diseases or "unique causes" and occasionally we are completely stymied.  We always try our best and we almost always learn from the experience.  

    Please remember, if you do bring a problem into the nursery, PUT IT IN A SEALED BAG. We try to keep the nursery clean and relatively pest free so we are really frustrated when pests are brought in.

     

  • Thank Heaven, a little more winter!

    I'm not going to lie, the nursery has better "numbers" in drought years. It's not just because we ardently promote drought tolerant landscaping nor the fact that we are avid native plant promoters; it's just that our season is longer, the snow melts sooner, and people have more time to spend in their gardens.  That said... NONE of us at Villager want dry winters.  We love wildflowers and lush meadows and obviously fear the threat of fire.  So... we are happy that winter snows have made a nice late showing.  Himmel sei Dank für Schnee!

    I often explain to clients that tossing wildflowers, like hydroseeding, is termed "Spray and Pray" because we spread the seed and pray that weather conditions will be favorable for both germination of the seed and for seedling survival.  Folks that planted seed this Feb and March (my favorite time for s&p), should be delighted come May as the warmed soil combined with all this moisture are making for excellent wildflower success.

    And for real success... We received 8000lbs of Biosol this week, at the request of dozens of clients (before winter returned).  We have about 7400lbs remaining in case your garden melts-out.  We started-off loving all-organic Biosol for its apparent vole-repelling properties but have continued to use it vigorously because it makes vegetable gardens, trees, shrubs, perennials, bubs and, of course, lawns, lush, healthy and strong throughout the growing season.

  • Truckee Trees, Truckee Bulbs, Truckee Seeds, Truckee Shrubs, Truckee Perennials

    In the populated locations of the Sierra Nevada (or the Rockies for that matter) the climate does not get much more challenging than it does in Truckee, Glenshire & Hirschdale.  Trees, Shrubs, Perennials, Groundcovers, Bulbs and Seeds that thrive in Truckee, plants that the Villager Nursery offers, will grow well anywhere in the mountain west.  Really.  We have MANY wonderful clients from Reno, Colfax, Nevada City, Downieville, Quincy, Portola, Meyers and more mountain-top, glacial valley and upper foothill locations.

    Fall sales are "technically" over, and we have one more load of trees arriving approx. 10/25.  We are like the trees at the Villager these days... changing color but not yet dropping our leaves.  We have begun cutting back perennials and fertilizing with Biosol and Gardner & Bloome but we have not yet begun putting the plants into the shade for winter.  Fall IS for planting and, in the sun at least, the soil is actually still accumulating the warmth that encourages root system expansion.  

    Do not forget to keep your plants and lawns moist.  It does not take much but do not let your plants dry out. Once a week-or-so is probably plenty, less often in shade.  Hopefully you got the memo and  mulched ALL bare soil with Gromulch and wood chips to reduce moisture loss, keep out weeds, reduce temperature swings in the roots and to feed the soil.  Winterizing Class Saturday 10/26 from 10-11am. ($5-ish donation to the Farwest Nordic Junior Ski Program).

    Get your BIOSOL now before we run out again.  Sign-up for the newsletter to receive wonderful coupons and timely advice. Check-in with us or even "Like" us on Facebook just for the fun of it. Or look for the BIOSOL give-away deal!

  • Truckee Trees, Truckee Bulbs, Truckee Seeds, Truckee Shrubs, Truckee Perennials

    In the populated locations of the Sierra Nevada (or the Rockies for that matter) the climate does not get much more challenging than it does in Truckee, Glenshire & Hirschdale.  Trees, Shrubs, Perennials, Groundcovers, Bulbs and Seeds that thrive in Truckee, plants that the Villager Nursery offers, will grow well anywhere in the mountain west.  Really.  We have MANY wonderful clients from Reno, Colfax, Nevada City, Downieville, Quincy, Portola, Meyers and even many more high foothill to summit locations.

    Fall sales are "technically" over, and we have one more load of trees arriving approx. 10/25.  We are like the trees at the Villager these days... changing color but not yet dropping our leaves.  We have begun cutting back perennials and fertilizing with Biosol and Gardner & Bloome but we have not yet begun putting the plants into the shade for winter.  Fall IS for planting and, in the sun at least, the soil is actually still accumulating the warmth that encourages root system expansion.  

    Do not forget to keep your plants and lawns moist.  It does not take much but do not let your plants dry out. Once a week-or-so is probably plenty, less often in shade.  Hopefully you got the memo and  mulched ALL bare soil with Gromulch and wood chips to reduce moisture loss, keep out weeds, reduce temperature swings in the roots and to feed the soil.  Winterizing Class Saturday 10/26 from 10-11am. ($5 donation to the Farwest Nordic Foundation).

    UNTIL we start putting plants away (~after Halloween):  

    20% OFF Trees and Shrubs*    

    *except the spruce we've just brought in for living holiday decor.

    40% OFF 4" & Quart Perennials (not woody)

    30% OFF #1g and larger Perennials

    Awesome and hardy wildflower-type bulbs, Garlic and more.  Wildflower seeds for Tahoe, Truckee and the High Sierra along with, always, the best advice for far-better-than-average successes.  

    Pumpkins: 3.99 each.

    Get your BIOSOL now before we run out.  Sign-up for the newsletter to receive wonderful coupons ad timely advice. Check-in with us or even "Like" us on Facebook just for the fun of it.

  • Reserving your tree = happy children

    We are so happy to select and reserve your Christmas tree of any size and hold or deliver it to your condo, home, villa or castle. For wild-harvested Silvertip trees, we bring along our order list and cut trees to suit ("14 foot and narrow - Nemo" or "21 feet and open enough for candles - Sully", etc...).  It can be challenging for us to find your perfect tree but we love the task.  We offer "dense" and "open" Noble Fir from 5-11 feet tall. Special orders for trees 12-15 feet tall, made before the end of October, will be tagged in the high-elevation plantation a month before they are harvested. The trees are cut and delivered within 36 hours to our refrigerated climate in early December. Reserved trees are tagged as soon as they are delivered (the pick-of-the-litter) and kept in cold, deep shade. 

    Truckee, notoriously, runs short of quality (hydrated) cut Christmas trees in the last days before the holiday.  We actually sell most of our ~300 trees between the 19th and 22nd of December.  We try to have enough fresh trees but still occasionally run-out by the 22nd or 23rd as we did in 2012 (while 40 people picked-up their reserved trees the same days). We offered-up the ornament display tree in the store and the 18-footer out front on the 24th and were VERY sorry to not have enough for the families with small children who were so disappointed on Christmas Eve.

  • Truckee - Tahoe Christmas Trees 2012

    2012 Villager Nursery Christmas Offerings

    The Villager boys (all of us) go out for several days each November and harvest fresh, high elevation silvertip Christmas trees from snowy mountain tops (talk about a work-out).  With the incredible fall we enjoyed this year, we had to wait and wait and wait until it got cold enough to harvest (if we harvest before the deep cold, the trees don't hold-up in your home). 

    And, of course, as soon as it was cold enough to harvest we received enough snow to keep us out of much of the high country.  In spite of chains and slippery slopes and post-holing through snow atop brush, we managed to bring down a few good loads of nice Silvertip.  We also harvested some very full white fir from slightly lower.  We may yet get out to harvest a few more.

    We also brought down 150 BEAUTIFUL fresh Noble Fir from a great little grower, high in the Oregon coast range.  Troy (the grower) uses compost teas and organic fertilizers for superior trees. He actually measures for degrees Brix (°Bx: sugar content) of his fir needles and compares his to other growers. His have far more sugar and as a result, hold more water, last much longer and are more aromatic.   We have Noble Fir from 5-14'.  

    Troy harvests a portion of our Noble Fir with more natural form ("Open Grade"). These have the tiers of branches with space for ornaments (like Silvertip) but with twice as many branches, rich green color and the superior Noble Fir fragrance.

    While many tree lots sell through thousands of trees, Villager nursery usually sells 2-300.  We have 50 or so for folks that pre-order in September and October and we cut-to-order Silvertips up to 25ft. tall.  It is not to late to reserve a tree: call or e-mail to let us know what you'd like so we can tag it and keep it in the shade.

    We usually only sell a third of our trees before the 18th of December and the bulk between the 19-22nd:  4 busy days after weeks of taking care of them and shaking off the snow. The trees stay very fresh in our "refrigerated" climate.

    If you're interested in living trees we have hardy Colorado and Engelmann Spruce.  Our care instructions here and Spruce planting instructions here.

    As always we have a large selection of wreaths from 19in. to 6ft.  We have mixed and fresh cedar garland by the 75ft. roll or by the foot.  We have mistletoe, greens by the pound, swags, etc...  Sales of our super-full 23" mixed wreaths support a non-profit horticultural training center, providing training and employment opportunities to men and women with varying developmental disabilities.  We've been offering their wreaths since 1984.

    In the shop we have beautiful ornaments, candles, soaps, and a nice selection of subtle holiday accoutrements.

    We are still here.  The lights are still on. 

    Merry Christmas to anyone who might read this!  Thanks so much for keeping us alive.

    Eric Larusson

    Villager Nursery, Inc

    Truckee, CA

  • 5 Paths to Abundance in your Mountain Garden next Spring and Summer


    1. Plant Trees and Shrubs Now. Deciduous trees and shrubs including apples and berries will produce as much as 80% of their annual root system expansion in fall, AFTER they lose their leaves. Don't miss this opportunity for amazing growth in your garden.(Trees and Shrubs 20% off and Buy-2-get-1-FREE fruit trees and berry bushes)
    2. Plant Perennials Now. Perennial flowers, herbs and vegetables will produce many more roots this fall. They'll rest in your soil over winter and rise with our natural spring schedule to produce far more bounty next summer. (Flowering perennials 30% off, perennial herbs and vegetables 50% off!)
    3. Apply Biosol in Fall. Biosol is a humus rich, natural and organic, slow-releasing fertilizer that improves soil while providing essential nutrients for plants and the billions of micro-allies that help plants thrive. For gardens, orchards, flowers, lawns, meadows and forests. (see coupon in newsletter...or sign-up for the next one)
    4. Topdress Your Gardens.  Applying Gromulch, Bumpercrop or Black Forest Mulch over the soil between plants protects shallow roots, introduces composting microorganisms, ads humus and provides a perfect transition layer under coarser wood or bark mulches. Gardens with more mulch suffered far less in last winter's drought. (ALL mulches, composts and potting soils are buy-4-get-1-FREE through 9/17)
    5. Go into winter with moist soil.  Make sure that after the plants have gone dormant, you continue to water occasionally to keep soil moisture plentiful.  Your plants' expanding root systems need the moisture to keep on going long after the tops appear to be asleep.  We often say water one-last-time around Thanksgiving but you may need to water after that.
  • Back to School Specials!

    In late June, I put together a planter for Erica who is a 2nd year UCLA student and LOVES her school.  The sky-blue Salvia uliginosa was not quite in bloom but the light-blue lobelia and sunshine-gold Golden Fleece Dahlberg Daisy were bright enough.  This is only my second year using S. uliginosa, Bog Sage, in planters and I'm a fan!

     

    I'm working on finishing a Back-to-School / Labor Day newsletter - sending it out Wednesday to be good through Sept. 10.  I'm out-a-here, heading for the Playa.

  • Silvertip Christmas Trees in Truckee

    The Villager staff (all of us boys left here in late November) go out and harvests fresh, high elevation silvertip Christmas trees from snowy mountain tops.  This year we had to wait and wait until it got cold enough to harvest.  If you cut before severe cold, the trees do not hold up as well.  

    When the temps finally dropped, we had exactly 5 days to harvest before the monster storms of Thanksgiving 2010.  As a result we harvested fewer than usual but they were lovely trees.

    While the Boy Scouts and Optimists sell through thousands of trees, the Villager usually sells about 200.  We have 50 or so folks that pre-order and we cut-to-order for them then we bring in 100 HUGE fresh Noble Fir from a great little grower, high in the Oregon coast range.  Troy (the grower) actualy measures for degrees Brix (symbol °Bx: the sugar content) of his fir and compares his to other growers.  His have far more sugar and as a result, hold more water, last longer and smell better.   The 12' trees we received this year weighed nearly 280 lbs but they were spectacular.

    We ususlly sell a few trees before the 20th and the bulk between the 20-23rd.  3 busy days after uncovering these trees from snow for weeks.   We were actually running pretty low so I ran over to a friend's tree lot this morning (they have acres of land north of the Sierra Buttes) and picked up 30 trees.   

    At this point, we have about 20 nice silvertip Christmas Trees left.   530 587 0771   12/21/2010

    I've been so lame with the blog this fall, we were soo busy, Thank Goodness!.   Rob and Eric had an epic trip to the southern Sierra to collect wild birch seeds.   Eric went to Salt Lake City to tour retail nurseries and steal great ideas.  Eric had a 50th birthday surprise party! And we are still here.  The lights are still on.

    Merry Christmas to anyone who might read this!  Thanks so much for keeping us alive.

    Eric Larusson

    Villager Nursery, Inc

    Truckee, CA



Contact Villager

Villager Nursery, Inc
10678 Donner Pass Road, Truckee, CA 96161-4834
Central Truckee, exit 186 off I-80
(530) 587-0771
www.villagernursery.com
info@villagernursery

Founded 1975, Incorporated 1990

California Nursery License 1975
No. C 3976.001, Co.29CA
Contractors License 1977
No. 413907-C27 LS
ISA Certified Arborist: Eric Larusson
No. WE-7983A

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