Everything listed under: Truckee nursery

  • February & March

    I was just looking back at the rains, snowfalls, low-temps, high-temps for the Feb & March. We didn't see much sun. I grew up in California and in the Sierras.  I'd been to Utah, Coloradoo, the midwest in winters and my memory was of extreme cold, squeaky snow, frozen fingers. I'd been plenty cold skiing and sledding as a kid in the Sierra, but out there, I didn't want to play outside.  Someone who'd moved to Truckee from the east to ski told me years ago that the Sierra winter is 2-3 days of snowfall followed by a week of sunshine, and throughout my life, that been largely true, I just didn't know that it was unique. This winter did not feel that way. I recall shoveling, a lot. The crawl-spaces flooded. Trees bent, broken or up-rooted. I hate to admit that I didn't feel much like getting out and enjoying that white sh*t.  

    We did have some beautiful spring-like days in March, which is normal, followed by more and more winter, which is also normal.  For folks that have moved here after spring 2011, this "spring" might seem unfair but I assure you it is by-far the norm. 

    From a gardening, landscaping and ecological perspective, the soils have been well insulated, are warm and many plants have been able to produce roots all winter long. Hardy seedlings are emerging beneath the melting snow and the ample soil moisture promises an amazing summer of wildflowers. I just walked along one well traveled road with five pounds of native wildflower seed mixed with Biosol.  Like those bulbs and sunflowers on Glenshire Dr. that Katrin and I planted, I hope to see these for years to come. 

    Voles, who do not hibernate, have been eating and breeding all winter, well hidden from their normal predators. We're just starting to see what havoc they have wreaked. 

    I'm enjoying raking my lawn in narrow paths AS the snow melts, just a little, every couple of days and it is a very manageable job.  We're expecting our first load of compost, including topper, in early April and I'll spread that around on the freshly raked turf.  I have SO much pruning and clean-up to do. I'm trying to follow the snow-melt to stay on top of it. If you lost plants, we are very sorry.  We did too and so did most folks. Snowshoing through the woods you can see that this was a harsh winter ALL around, MANY native trees and shrubs suffered damage as well.

    The snow-plow loaders pushed piles and ramps of snow thirty feet into my yard and I've yet to see the tops of many plants while the rotary plows that came through on some very cold nights literally shattered my blue spruce. I've seen the same on native fir. These plants all have root systems to support them, plenty of moisture in the soil and a determination to live and grow. Plants may develop a little "character" that stays with them forever and we'll be able to look at the dog-leg in a tree 20 years from now and say - "Ah! That's from the winter or '16-17".

  • 4th of July

    Happy Independence Day!  Villager will be hanging-out, watering plants, watching the parade and we'll stick-around until 2:00 pm or so the close and head for cool water.  We're open regular hours Tuesday, 9-5:30p.

  • Open after the parade UNTIL 2:00 on the 4th.

    ​We were here cheering for runners and watching the parade then watering the nursery. Open & 'round for a few folks needing hanging baskets, posies and wildflowers in the rain. ;)

    Thanks to all who joined us during the parade and appreciated Jose's awesome fiesta of Carne Asada and fixin's 

     

  • Free Planting Days

    6th Annual Free Planting Days May 30th and 31st Friday AND Saturday, 10am - 3pm

    You buy the flower or vegetable plants and decorative pots at the Villager (or bring up to 3 pots from home) and then  Mike, Gisele AND Duncan will plant them-up for you using premium Master Nursery Gardener's Gold potting soils and bio-active, organic G&B (Gardner&Bloome) Fertilizers

    (We'll also use water-holding "flubber-nuggets" gel.) Come join the fun and create colorful baskets and planters to enjoy all summer. -Maximum pot size 18” in diameter, no window boxes or whiskey barrels please.

    Don’t have the time for one of the Villager’s free Saturday or Wednesday seminars? Kellogg Garden Products expert Mike McLain and organic-gardening specialist and educator with G&B Organics, Gisele Schoniger will both be delighted to answer ANY and ALL compost, mulch, organic fertilizer, soil biology questions that you can dream up.     Sunset is at 8:20pm 5/30.


  • Truckee Gardening Season

    Our gardening season and our "growing season" are not the same. We were gardening in February this year, planting shrubs we didn't get to in the fall as well as seeds and bulbs we forgot we had.  MANY clients were preparing their raised-beds and planting beet and radish seeds. The could have been plating seedlings of chard and kale as well. The best spinach I've ever had was grown from seedlings I planted in early April that then laid covered with snow for 2+ weeks. Our growing season, according to NOAA, is our "frost-free period", when we have less than a 10% chance of ≤ 32°F on any given night, is July 15-August 15.  July 31 is the middle of our growing season.

    Our "average" temperatures are derived from wildly fluctuating daily temperatures at all times of the year. The average gives us a rough guide with which we make wildly fluctuating guesses at how cold it might get on any given day.  That said, it is a tool, much like the USDA zones or the useless-to-mountain-folk Sunset western zones (see Northeastern for a more useful tool).  I've posted this pic of our chalkboard before but it "bears repeating".

    Here is a graph of an "average" winter (temperature-wise). Jan15, 2013-Jan 14, 2014. For interest, note where the "average" nighttime low is ≥32° and where the average daytime temps average ≥70°F.

    I think that, without a greenhouse, our "average" mountain gardening season in Truckee is about March 15 - November 1 (or 15).  It is a matter of taking advantage of clear and warm conditions, choosing the right plants and crops and being able to protect the harvests of others (see RowCover). If you have an unheated greenhouse you can add 3-6 weeks on either end of that gardening season for some veggies. 

    I have planted hardy annuals in February MANY times with great success (pansy, viola, dianthus, calendula, stock, primrose) and I have also planted dormant trees and shrubs in December, January, February and March with excellent success.

  • 3rd Dry Winter... so far

    We all hope this force-field around the Sierras will vanish soon and let in our moisture.  That little bit of drizzle and snow was beneficial for sure but not nearly enough for landscapes nor for our snow-dependent businesses.  I count on nordic skiing to get me in shape for working all summer and I've been once... in Utah.

    If you have new platings in a sunny location that has no snow you might consider dragging out a hose and giving those new plantings some water. This is a winter-watering blog from January 2012:  http://www.villagernursery.com/winter-watering-january-2012

  • Truckee Trees, Truckee Bulbs, Truckee Seeds, Truckee Shrubs, Truckee Perennials

    In the populated locations of the Sierra Nevada (or the Rockies for that matter) the climate does not get much more challenging than it does in Truckee, Glenshire & Hirschdale.  Trees, Shrubs, Perennials, Groundcovers, Bulbs and Seeds that thrive in Truckee, plants that the Villager Nursery offers, will grow well anywhere in the mountain west.  Really.  We have MANY wonderful clients from Reno, Colfax, Nevada City, Downieville, Quincy, Portola, Meyers and more mountain-top, glacial valley and upper foothill locations.

    Fall sales are "technically" over, and we have one more load of trees arriving approx. 10/25.  We are like the trees at the Villager these days... changing color but not yet dropping our leaves.  We have begun cutting back perennials and fertilizing with Biosol and Gardner & Bloome but we have not yet begun putting the plants into the shade for winter.  Fall IS for planting and, in the sun at least, the soil is actually still accumulating the warmth that encourages root system expansion.  

    Do not forget to keep your plants and lawns moist.  It does not take much but do not let your plants dry out. Once a week-or-so is probably plenty, less often in shade.  Hopefully you got the memo and  mulched ALL bare soil with Gromulch and wood chips to reduce moisture loss, keep out weeds, reduce temperature swings in the roots and to feed the soil.  Winterizing Class Saturday 10/26 from 10-11am. ($5-ish donation to the Farwest Nordic Junior Ski Program).

    Get your BIOSOL now before we run out again.  Sign-up for the newsletter to receive wonderful coupons and timely advice. Check-in with us or even "Like" us on Facebook just for the fun of it. Or look for the BIOSOL give-away deal!

  • Truckee Trees, Truckee Bulbs, Truckee Seeds, Truckee Shrubs, Truckee Perennials

    In the populated locations of the Sierra Nevada (or the Rockies for that matter) the climate does not get much more challenging than it does in Truckee, Glenshire & Hirschdale.  Trees, Shrubs, Perennials, Groundcovers, Bulbs and Seeds that thrive in Truckee, plants that the Villager Nursery offers, will grow well anywhere in the mountain west.  Really.  We have MANY wonderful clients from Reno, Colfax, Nevada City, Downieville, Quincy, Portola, Meyers and even many more high foothill to summit locations.

    Fall sales are "technically" over, and we have one more load of trees arriving approx. 10/25.  We are like the trees at the Villager these days... changing color but not yet dropping our leaves.  We have begun cutting back perennials and fertilizing with Biosol and Gardner & Bloome but we have not yet begun putting the plants into the shade for winter.  Fall IS for planting and, in the sun at least, the soil is actually still accumulating the warmth that encourages root system expansion.  

    Do not forget to keep your plants and lawns moist.  It does not take much but do not let your plants dry out. Once a week-or-so is probably plenty, less often in shade.  Hopefully you got the memo and  mulched ALL bare soil with Gromulch and wood chips to reduce moisture loss, keep out weeds, reduce temperature swings in the roots and to feed the soil.  Winterizing Class Saturday 10/26 from 10-11am. ($5 donation to the Farwest Nordic Foundation).

    UNTIL we start putting plants away (~after Halloween):  

    20% OFF Trees and Shrubs*    

    *except the spruce we've just brought in for living holiday decor.

    40% OFF 4" & Quart Perennials (not woody)

    30% OFF #1g and larger Perennials

    Awesome and hardy wildflower-type bulbs, Garlic and more.  Wildflower seeds for Tahoe, Truckee and the High Sierra along with, always, the best advice for far-better-than-average successes.  

    Pumpkins: 3.99 each.

    Get your BIOSOL now before we run out.  Sign-up for the newsletter to receive wonderful coupons ad timely advice. Check-in with us or even "Like" us on Facebook just for the fun of it.

  • Villager Test

    (January, 2013).  For the first time, since we took over the existing Villager Florist in 1975, we will try closing for a couple of months.  It seems to make sense. As a fanatical gardener and botanist, I can't help responding to interesting phone calls and e-mails on my own time so if you have a burning question, by-all-means, drop us a line.  I answered a phone message from a Truckee visitor who wanted info about the trees in downtown Truckee that no one could answer so the Town of Truckee recommended he call "the Villager Nursery...they know everything".  We love that kind of high praise ... and of course, it's true.  :)

    We have long used Lewis Hill's book Cold-Climate Gardening wherein it is written "on whatever it is they write it it on up there" that "in northern Vermont the first Tuesday in March, New England's Town Meeting Day, is the traditional time to plant tomato seeds inside".  "They like heat, lots of light and exactly the right amount of moisture."  The Villager will be open part-time by then and we'll be here to provide you with all your cold-climate seed starting supplies from organic, short-season seeds to organic seedling potting soils, trays, heat-mats, lighting and all the rest.

  • Reserving your tree = happy children

    We are so happy to select and reserve your Christmas tree of any size and hold or deliver it to your condo, home, villa or castle. For wild-harvested Silvertip trees, we bring along our order list and cut trees to suit ("14 foot and narrow - Nemo" or "21 feet and open enough for candles - Sully", etc...).  It can be challenging for us to find your perfect tree but we love the task.  We offer "dense" and "open" Noble Fir from 5-11 feet tall. Special orders for trees 12-15 feet tall, made before the end of October, will be tagged in the high-elevation plantation a month before they are harvested. The trees are cut and delivered within 36 hours to our refrigerated climate in early December. Reserved trees are tagged as soon as they are delivered (the pick-of-the-litter) and kept in cold, deep shade. 

    Truckee, notoriously, runs short of quality (hydrated) cut Christmas trees in the last days before the holiday.  We actually sell most of our ~300 trees between the 19th and 22nd of December.  We try to have enough fresh trees but still occasionally run-out by the 22nd or 23rd as we did in 2012 (while 40 people picked-up their reserved trees the same days). We offered-up the ornament display tree in the store and the 18-footer out front on the 24th and were VERY sorry to not have enough for the families with small children who were so disappointed on Christmas Eve.

  • Happy Birthday Villager

    December 1, 1975 - December 1, 2013

    We have continued to grow and branch and flower and fruit and hedge and adapt in order to offer our clients an interesting, useful and beautiful selection of plant materials and products that insure your successes.  "We've killed thousands of plants, testing them in our own gardens, so our clients won't have to."

    Our Founder, Jeanette Harper and a partner finalized the purchase of the existing florist in the Gateway center 12/1/1975 and celebrated with Champagne in the office of the Gateway Motel with Roxie Arche and Azad McIver (Our current location is Azad's old home and dairy). 

    Eric showed-up in 1984 and Rob a couple of years after that.  Quite a few nurseries have come and gone in Truckee in 38 years. Some only lasted a season some for a decade or more.  We needed to move our nursery from Gateway to our current home in 1999. The reality is that Truckee is a ridiculous place to run a retail nursery. It seems that you have to be crazy. We also happen to be fanatical botanists and ecologists hell-bent on providing education and materials to local gardeners to show them that they CAN succeed in this harsh climate.

    We've thought that we could just offer the 20% of the plants that 80% of clients ask for and we'd be probably be profitable ... But what about the other 80% of really cool unique native and hardy plants that people SHOULD be using..? And what about that 20% of customers who LOVE natives or thrill at really cool, unique plants, bulbs and seeds from the far coldest corners and peaks around the globe?  It's more interesting the way we've been growing.  We are continually aware that we have YOU to thank for keeping us rooted in Truckee.  Thank You!

    Villager Nursery: helping mountain gardens thrive since 1975.  Experience you can trust / Information you can use.

  • "BIOSOL ! You can grow grass on a lift-tower with that stuff !"

    Biosol Forte Label.pdf

    Biosol MSDS.pdf

    Biosol Studies link

    BIOSOL

    Villager Nursery's FAVOITE fertilizer.  Biosol is our favorite winterizing fertilizer.  We use Biosol in the Villager Demonstration Gardens, and in all of our commercial and residential landscape projects.  Biosol helps Truckee Shrubs, Trees, Perennials and Bulbs thrive.  The Villager stocks Biosol year-round.  

    Biosol is an incredibly long-lasting fertilizer with amazing soil improving characteristics as well.  It is primarily cooked Penicillium that was cultured on and digested organic cottonseed and organic soybean meals.  It was essentially a waste product that was once used for aquaculture.  What it lacks in pleasant aroma (it lacks pleasant aroma) it more than makes up for in its amazing performance in ANY part of the garden.  

    Put Biosol on lawns in Fall.  Now.

    Biosol is an essential with any restoration, wildflower or lawn seeding.  Mix your grass and wildflower seeds with Biosol and Kellogg's Topper and broadcast just before we're expecting a huge snow.  So many folks over the years have said to us.."I know Biosol, we used to use it at (insert any ski area in the northern hemisphere here) and we swore you could grow grass on a lift tower with that stuff!"

  • WINTERIZING YOUR GARDEN

    Here are a couple of pertinent links:

    Winterizing your Mountain Garden.pdf

    Tree Winterizing Instructions.pdf

    Tahoe Arts and Mountain Culture

    In spite of the moisture we received last week in the form of snow, the soils are still quite warm and this is the best time of year for planting.  The beauty of the snow (besides the literal beauty) is that it   s l o w l y  infiltrated our parched soils. It was a nice, slow, deeply penetrating watering.  Perfect for native and landscape plants to increase fall root-system expansion.

    October IS Planting Season.  Once the leaves fall, woody deciduous plants (trees and shrubs) begin expanding their root systems.  Our soils are warm, we'll get a little precipitation, the summer's worth of photosynthates are shuttled and stored in stems, trunks and roots. The root systems use this stored energy to grow. Most conifers ("evergreens") produce the majority of their root expansion very early in spring (March, April).  AND perennials planted THIS fall will rise aggressively larger and will grow and bloom in their appropriate seasons next summer.  We always remind clients that with perennials, you areplanting-for-NEXT-year, and when you plant in fall, you don't have to wait as long for spring. There is really no other time to plant bulbs so... for the next month... Dig, Drop, Done. Bulbs are the easiest perennial color in your garden.  We have a great selection of animal-proof Narcissus (every shape, size and bloom time) as well as wildflower-like alliums that are almost never touched by critters.  Bulb Class Hand-Out

    - If you missed the last newsletter, register for our occasional newsletters here for more specials coming soon.

  • 5 Paths to Abundance in your Mountain Garden next Spring and Summer


    1. Plant Trees and Shrubs Now. Deciduous trees and shrubs including apples and berries will produce as much as 80% of their annual root system expansion in fall, AFTER they lose their leaves. Don't miss this opportunity for amazing growth in your garden.(Trees and Shrubs 20% off and Buy-2-get-1-FREE fruit trees and berry bushes)
    2. Plant Perennials Now. Perennial flowers, herbs and vegetables will produce many more roots this fall. They'll rest in your soil over winter and rise with our natural spring schedule to produce far more bounty next summer. (Flowering perennials 30% off, perennial herbs and vegetables 50% off!)
    3. Apply Biosol in Fall. Biosol is a humus rich, natural and organic, slow-releasing fertilizer that improves soil while providing essential nutrients for plants and the billions of micro-allies that help plants thrive. For gardens, orchards, flowers, lawns, meadows and forests. (see coupon in newsletter...or sign-up for the next one)
    4. Topdress Your Gardens.  Applying Gromulch, Bumpercrop or Black Forest Mulch over the soil between plants protects shallow roots, introduces composting microorganisms, ads humus and provides a perfect transition layer under coarser wood or bark mulches. Gardens with more mulch suffered far less in last winter's drought. (ALL mulches, composts and potting soils are buy-4-get-1-FREE through 9/17)
    5. Go into winter with moist soil.  Make sure that after the plants have gone dormant, you continue to water occasionally to keep soil moisture plentiful.  Your plants' expanding root systems need the moisture to keep on going long after the tops appear to be asleep.  We often say water one-last-time around Thanksgiving but you may need to water after that.
  • Truckee Spring - Mid-May

    Day-length pretty close to its maximum now, the soils continue to absorb the sun's radiation and the average temperatures are climbing.  May starts with an average low of 27°F and ends with an average low of 34°F.  Our night-time temps have been WAY above average for weeks an averages are just the mathematical numbers in the middle of the extremes of reality.  It will be nearly miraculous (or ominous) if we don't have more snow and a lot more frost.  That is not to deter gardening, God-knows I've been going at it since early April and am delighted at my gardens.  My comments are to remind you to be prepared to cover when the cold returns.

    We are having a HUGE sale on our pre-packaged 10x12' 1.5oz frost fabric (packaged by "easy gardener") reg. 15.99 on sale for 10.99 through Memorial Day.  It is great to use when transitioning plants from the house or shade to the outdoors as well.  I just leave it over the plants for a few days.  It is also important to have on hand in for fall cold when I often leave it over the garden for days or weeks at a time.  AND as a bonus... WE use it top protect ferns, hosta, rhubarb, thimbleberry and dogwood from HAIL!  it works great.  If hail is called for, I cover plants before leaving for work.


Contact Villager

Villager Nursery, Inc
10678 Donner Pass Road, Truckee, CA 96161-4834
Central Truckee, exit 186 off I-80
(530) 587-0771
www.villagernursery.com
info@villagernursery

Founded 1975, Incorporated 1990

California Nursery License 1975
No. C 3976.001, Co.29CA
Contractors License 1977
No. 413907-C27 LS
ISA Certified Arborist: Eric Larusson
No. WE-7983A

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