Everything listed under: Truckee Perennials

  • October 2015

    https://www.facebook.com/VillagerNursery  If you're not on our Villager newsletter list.  October specials: http://conta.cc/1PuK0Bw

    October is like April in some ways. It's a genuine gardening month and a chance to get a head-start with excellent sunny days and warm weather but it frequently turns to winter and on Halloween (like Easter) it's usually pretty hard on he kids. November, like March can go either way.  March has the advantage of longer days for getting hardy veggies going early but November has much warmer soil for keeping roots growing and the shorter days equate to less evapotranspiration and less stress on the above-ground portions of plants while root growth progresses in ernest.

    Plant bulbs now.  We hand select our favorites for their beauty, interest, persistence and repeat performance. Almost ALL of the bulbs we offer you are deer and rodent resistant perennials and we have bulbs that bloom in late February through bulbs that bloom in early August.  You can plant hardy spring-blooming bulbs any time between now and ... February but it's a lot more trouble planting them under several feet of snow or in frozen ground (both of which I've done... more than once). If you're considering planting wildflowers, remember to also plant wildflower-type bulbs and be sure to plant some 4"-pots of native wildflowers at the same time to really get a jump on establishment.

    Fall is for planting. Fall is NOT for pruning. I think the common misconception comes from the warmer climes of CA & the southwest where there really is no winter and fall and spring overlap in December and January (imagine pears with fall color and spring blooms at the same time as frequently happens there.) Woody plants store their winter reserves of food in their stems, branches, trunks and roots (plants are alive and respiring all winter). Fall pruning steals-away the energy they have saved.  Pruning cuts made on dormant wood in fall do not seal over and the fresh-cut tissues dry-out and die-back in our long winters.  There is also a much greater chance of infection from fungal disease when cuts are made in fall. Cuts made in late winter / early spring seal-over as top-growth begins (and the stored energy in the stems has been used to maintain vigor).  That said, if you have a funky branch that the snow is going to remove if you don't... absolutely, prune it now.

    We don't LOVE tree wrapping. We do it because it is inexpensive insurance against breakage and toppling in the first winter or two after planting and it can protect at-risk trees or shrubs for many years where snow is stored, thrown or shoved. It is best to prune well the first few years in order to develop plants that will tolerate our potentially very heavy snow-loads.  We'll have a couple more classes this fall / winter. Follow our Facebook page for far more frequent updates and information.

    Take advantage of the newsletter coupon for Biosol.  If you've never tried it, it is expensive, it smells and it's crazy-good for improving soil, feeding beneficial soil biology and for feeding plants over a very long period. We use it alternately (Biosol fall) with Dr.Earth or G&B fertilizers because they'll also inoculate your soils with fresh microorganisms. It's probiotics folks and it's been going on in farming for millennia.  The Sierras are only 3-4 million years old, an infant range, our rocks need a lot of help supporting plant life.  Oh, and please, don't forget to mulch, on top, to hold moisture, protect roots & microbes, and provide a long-term source of carbon for the soil.

    Indian Summer  (The Sweet-Spot for planting EVERYTHING!)
    Oct. Hours: Mon.-Sat.  9:50AM-5:00PM & Sunday10:00AM-4:00PM
    If you need help with products, plans, bids or consulting, please  contact us with your questions or for an appointment.  You can also call and leave a message at 530-587-0771

     

  • Thank Heaven, a little more winter!

    I'm not going to lie, the nursery has better "numbers" in drought years. It's not just because we ardently promote drought tolerant landscaping nor the fact that we are avid native plant promoters; it's just that our season is longer, the snow melts sooner, and people have more time to spend in their gardens.  That said... NONE of us at Villager want dry winters.  We love wildflowers and lush meadows and obviously fear the threat of fire.  So... we are happy that winter snows have made a nice late showing.  Himmel sei Dank für Schnee!

    I often explain to clients that tossing wildflowers, like hydroseeding, is termed "Spray and Pray" because we spread the seed and pray that weather conditions will be favorable for both germination of the seed and for seedling survival.  Folks that planted seed this Feb and March (my favorite time for s&p), should be delighted come May as the warmed soil combined with all this moisture are making for excellent wildflower success.

    And for real success... We received 8000lbs of Biosol this week, at the request of dozens of clients (before winter returned).  We have about 7400lbs remaining in case your garden melts-out.  We started-off loving all-organic Biosol for its apparent vole-repelling properties but have continued to use it vigorously because it makes vegetable gardens, trees, shrubs, perennials, bubs and, of course, lawns, lush, healthy and strong throughout the growing season.

  • "BIOSOL ! You can grow grass on a lift-tower with that stuff !"

    Biosol Forte Label.pdf

    Biosol MSDS.pdf

    Biosol Studies link

    BIOSOL

    Villager Nursery's FAVOITE fertilizer.  Biosol is our favorite winterizing fertilizer.  We use Biosol in the Villager Demonstration Gardens, and in all of our commercial and residential landscape projects.  Biosol helps Truckee Shrubs, Trees, Perennials and Bulbs thrive.  The Villager stocks Biosol year-round.  

    Biosol is an incredibly long-lasting fertilizer with amazing soil improving characteristics as well.  It is primarily cooked Penicillium that was cultured on and digested organic cottonseed and organic soybean meals.  It was essentially a waste product that was once used for aquaculture.  What it lacks in pleasant aroma (it lacks pleasant aroma) it more than makes up for in its amazing performance in ANY part of the garden.  

    Put Biosol on lawns in Fall.  Now.

    Biosol is an essential with any restoration, wildflower or lawn seeding.  Mix your grass and wildflower seeds with Biosol and Kellogg's Topper and broadcast just before we're expecting a huge snow.  So many folks over the years have said to us.."I know Biosol, we used to use it at (insert any ski area in the northern hemisphere here) and we swore you could grow grass on a lift tower with that stuff!"

  • WINTERIZING YOUR GARDEN

    Here are a couple of pertinent links:

    Winterizing your Mountain Garden.pdf

    Tree Winterizing Instructions.pdf

    Tahoe Arts and Mountain Culture

    In spite of the moisture we received last week in the form of snow, the soils are still quite warm and this is the best time of year for planting.  The beauty of the snow (besides the literal beauty) is that it   s l o w l y  infiltrated our parched soils. It was a nice, slow, deeply penetrating watering.  Perfect for native and landscape plants to increase fall root-system expansion.

    October IS Planting Season.  Once the leaves fall, woody deciduous plants (trees and shrubs) begin expanding their root systems.  Our soils are warm, we'll get a little precipitation, the summer's worth of photosynthates are shuttled and stored in stems, trunks and roots. The root systems use this stored energy to grow. Most conifers ("evergreens") produce the majority of their root expansion very early in spring (March, April).  AND perennials planted THIS fall will rise aggressively larger and will grow and bloom in their appropriate seasons next summer.  We always remind clients that with perennials, you areplanting-for-NEXT-year, and when you plant in fall, you don't have to wait as long for spring. There is really no other time to plant bulbs so... for the next month... Dig, Drop, Done. Bulbs are the easiest perennial color in your garden.  We have a great selection of animal-proof Narcissus (every shape, size and bloom time) as well as wildflower-like alliums that are almost never touched by critters.  Bulb Class Hand-Out

    - If you missed the last newsletter, register for our occasional newsletters here for more specials coming soon.

Contact Villager

Villager Nursery, Inc
10678 Donner Pass Road, Truckee, CA 96161-4834
Central Truckee, exit 186 off I-80
(530) 587-0771
www.villagernursery.com
info@villagernursery

Founded 1975, Incorporated 1990

California Nursery License 1975
No. C 3976.001, Co.29CA
Contractors License 1977
No. 413907-C27 LS
ISA Certified Arborist: Eric Larusson
No. WE-7983A

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